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TODAY'S THOUGHT

One of the most evident signs of genuine godliness is a sincere display of appreciation towards your heavenly Father.

- Patricia Ennis

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 KHRT ND News

KHRT ND NEWS - THURSDAY - 09/14/17 - NOON EDITION

State Superintendent Kirsten Baesler has announced that Lynae J. Holmen, a special education teacher at Longfellow Elementary School in Minot, is a finalist for the North Dakota Teacher of the Year award....

    MINOT, N.D. - State Superintendent Kirsten Baesler has announced that Lynae J. Holmen, a special education teacher at Longfellow Elementary School in Minot, is a finalist for the North Dakota Teacher of the Year award.

    Baesler visited Longfellow today to inform Holmen that she had been chosen as one of the five finalists for the prestigious award. The superintendent is visiting each finalist in his or her school to call attention to the achievement and to celebrate teaching excellence in North Dakota's public schools.

    Holmen teaches students who are deaf or hard of hearing, and students who have learning disabilities. An alumna of Minot State University, Holmen has taught at Longfellow Elementary for 34 years.

    On Sept. 28, Baesler and Gov. Doug Burgum will honor the person who is chosen as North Dakota's 2018 Teacher of the Year. Holmen and Heather Tomlin-Rohr, a kindergarten teacher at Louis L'Amour Elementary in Jamestown, have been announced as finalists thus far. Baesler will visit the other three finalists next week.

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     FARGO, N.D. (AP) - The Civil Service Commission will not reinstate a former Fargo police officer who was fired in August. But, the commission Wednesday night could not decide whether Officer David Boelke, a 15-year veteran of the force, was dishonest about responding to some police calls disputed by officials. Commission member Jane Pettinger says there was insufficient evidence to support a claim of dishonesty.
 
     KVRR reports Boelke appealed his termination in order to clear his name. His attorney Mark Friese says Boelke was falsely "branded a liar," which has future implications for him.

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     FARGO, N.D. (AP) - A man serving life without parole for killing a West Fargo woman when he was 16 years old says he should be considered for a reduced sentence. Barry Garcia is the only state inmate who was sentenced to life without parole for a crime committed as a juvenile. He was convicted of murder and aggravated assault in the shooting death of Cheryl Tendeland in 1995.
 
     A Cass County judge in January rejected Garcia's argument that the sentence was unconstitutional. Garcia's lawyers are appealing to the state Supreme Court, citing a new state law that bans sentences for juveniles without the possibility of parole. Prosecutors say the Legislature did not intend the new law to apply to Garcia.
 
     Justices are scheduled to hear arguments in the case this afternoon in Steele.

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     JAMESTOWN, N.D. (AP) - History will be made when a new judge takes the oath in the Southeast Judicial District on Friday. Cherie Clark will be sworn in as the first female judge in the Southeast district. Clark was appointed by Gov. Doug Burgum. She was a prosecutor in Fargo since 2006 and previously worked in the Otter Tail County Attorney's office in Minnesota. KQDJ says Clark was nominated following the retirement of Judge John Greenwood. She'll take her oath at the courthouse in Jamestown.

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     NEW YORK (AP) - Apple fans who froze their credit after the Equifax data breach may end up with another hassle on their hands if they try to get one of the new iPhones that can cost more than $1,000. People who did so and want to make any big purchase may find the same.
 
     Since Equifax disclosed that 143 million Americans had their personal data hacked, experts have encouraged people to put in place a credit freeze. That locks down a person's credit from being stolen - but could also mean delays and more fees for those who want to finance a new phone. You can unfreeze your credit before a big purchase and freeze it again afterward. How long it will take and how much it costs vary state by state.

 

 


   (Copyright 2017 by The Associated Press.  All Rights Reserved.)

 

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