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TODAY'S THOUGHT

God wants to see prayers that are filled with genuine praise and thanksgiving for what He has done in the past. He wants our hearts to be filled with awe and gratitude for His blessings. He wants us to set up memorials in our hearts testifying to the provisions He has given us.

- Michael Youssef

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 KHRT ND News

KHRT ND NEWS - FRIDAY - 08/25/17 - NOON EDITION

A newborn baby found by police officers in Fargo who were searching for a missing pregnant woman was with another woman who's been arrested on a kidnapping charge....

     FARGO, N.D. (AP) - A newborn baby found by police officers in Fargo who were searching for a missing pregnant woman was with another woman who's been arrested on a kidnapping charge. Fargo police Chief David Todd says authorities believe the infant is the daughter of 22-year-old Savanna Greywind, but they're doing DNA testing to make sure. That could take several days.
 
     Greywind was last seen at her apartment Saturday afternoon and is still missing. Authorities found the newborn in an apartment in her building Thursday.
 
     Police late Thursday separately arrested a 32-year-old man and a 38-year-old woman who were neighbors of Greywind. Todd says the baby was found with the woman. Formal charges are pending against the suspects. The baby is in the custody of child protective services and is being cared for in a medical facility.
 
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     WHITE EARTH, N.D. (AP) - Authorities have identified a Tioga teenager who died in a rollover crash in Mountrail County. The Highway Patrol says 17-year-old Tanner Bagley was a passenger in a sport utility vehicle that went out of control on a curve on a gravel road and overturned in the ditch. The crash happened about 8:30 p.m. Wednesday near White Earth. The 15-year-old driver and 12- and 13-year-old passengers suffered undisclosed injuries. Charges are pending against the driver.

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     NEW TOWN, N.D. (AP) - A federal judge has extended an order allowing oil drilling at a site near a popular boat ramp near New Town. The Bismarck Tribune reports U.S. District Judge Daniel Hovland granted the extension through at least Oct. 31.
 
     The Three Affiliated Tribes had asked the federal government to halt drilling near a ramp at the Van Hook Resort. The tribe says the site should be farther away from Lake Sakakawea under tribal policy. The drilling site is only about 800 feet from the lake.
 
     The government initially agreed and ordered Slawson Exploration to halt its operations. But the company challenged the order in U.S. District Court and requested that work be allowed to continue while its appeal is considered.
 
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     BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) - The company that built the Dakota Access pipeline has responded to an offer by North Dakota regulators to settle state allegations that it improperly reported the discovery of American Indian artifacts during construction. But the response from Energy Transfer Partners isn't being disclosed yet. North Dakota Public Service Commissioner Julie Fedorchak says the agency will meet Monday to discuss the response.
 
     The commission on Aug. 14 made the Texas-based company an offer under which ETP would make a $15,000 "contribution" and wouldn't have to admit fault. Commissioners said it was an effort to end the drawn-out dispute over whether the company should be fined.
 
     If ETP accepts the offer, the complaint will be dismissed. If it rejects the offer, the commission will move forward with the complaint and schedule a public hearing.
 
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     MINOT, N.D. (AP) - A Minot clinic that has treated thousands of people for free is closing its doors after 18 years. The Minot Daily News reports City & Country Health Clinic will be treating its last patients Monday. Clinic Manager Candy Johnson says the facility isn't closing because of lack of money. She says the clinic board "felt that we have served our mission."
 
     Volunteers estimate that on average eight to 10 patients visited the clinic each week. The clinic has recently been open only Monday evenings, but over the years it was sometimes open two or three times a week.
 
     The clinic will be sending its equipment, including exam tables, blood pressure cuffs and diabetic monitors, to Global Health Ministries for distribution to developing nations.

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    BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) - The North Dakota Game and Fish Department has removed the open fire ban put in place in April on the Oahe Wildlife Management Area south of Bismarck-Mandan. The area still falls under burn restrictions implemented by Morton, Burleigh and Emmons counties. That means open fires, including campfires, are allowed only when the fire danger rating is low or moderate. The Oahe Wildlife Management Area covers 25 square miles in portions of the three counties. It's prone to wildfires when it's dry.

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     BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) - A Minnesota towing and hauling company is teaming up with a Plains farm aid nonprofit this weekend to ship tons of hay for about a dozen drought-stricken ranchers in North Dakota. Beyer Towing in Fergus Falls, Minnesota, and Farm Rescue have organized a convoy of 14 semi-loads of hay on Saturday and another half dozen loads on Sunday. The cattle feed being sold at a reduced price will be trucked about 225 miles from Rothsay, Minnesota, to Menoken, North Dakota.
 
     The latest U.S. Drought Monitor map shows 63 percent of North Dakota in some form of drought. Many ranchers have been forced to sell off cattle because they have no hay crop or can't afford to buy hay with demand pushing prices to as high as double the normal cost.

 

   (Copyright 2017 by The Associated Press.  All Rights Reserved.)

 

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