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KHRT ND NEWS - FRIDAY - 07/11/14 - MORNING EDITION

A company official says brine from a pipeline spill on the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation extends nearly 2 miles down a steep ravine.....

     MANDAREE, N.D. (AP) - A company official says brine from a pipeline spill  on the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation extends nearly 2 miles down a steep ravine.  Miranda Jones, vice president of Crestwood Midstream Partners Inc., says the cause of the spill appears to involve a separation of the pipe that carries oil-drilling saltwater. Crestwood subsidiary Arrow Pipeline LLC owns the pipeline.
 
     Jones says the path of the brine is 8,240 feet long and an area of dead vegetation extends about 200 yards from the source of the spill. It's estimated at about 24,000 barrels.  Crews are carrying equipment down the steep badlands by hand because of the rough topography.
 
    The Environmental Protection Agency says it's assessing the spill to ensure none of the brine reached a nearby bay. In its first statement in the two days since the spill was detected, the agency said it had no confirmed reports that the saltwater had reached the water body that feeds Lake Sakakawea.

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     DEVILS LAKE, N.D. (AP) - Authorities have charged a correctional officer with sexual assault for allegedly having sexual contact with an inmate at the Lake Region Law Enforcement Center in Devils Lake.
 
     Jonathan Defoe has been charged with one count of sexual assault, a Class C felony.  Ramsey County State's Attorney Lonnie Olson says Defoe allegedly had sexual contact with a female inmate. Court documents show the incident occurred on July 3.  The maximum penalty for Defoe's charge is five years.  An attorney for Defoe has not been listed.
 
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     GRAND FORKS, N.D. (AP) - One of two suspects in the shooting death of a man in Grand Forks has been ordered held without bond. Twenty-nine-year-old Delvin Shaw made his initial court appearance on Wednesday. Shaw and another man are accused of killing 24-year-old Jose Lopez in Grand Forks on June 24th.
 
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     DEVILS LAKE, N.D. (AP) - A committee reviewing ideas for a possible convention center and community wellness facility in Devils Lake plans to seek a special election this fall. The committee will go before the City Commission later this month to request an October 7th public vote on increasing the city's sales tax to finance the $23.5 million project. The events center would be in the soon-to-be-vacant Wal-Mart building, with the wellness center to be built on the Lake Region State campus.

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    BISMARCK, ND (PNS) - It's a parent's worst nightmare, but it happens every summer: kids suffer heatstroke and, in some cases, die after being left in hot cars.  Registered nurse Phyllis Larimore points out that children left inside a vehicle can suffer fatal hyperthermia in just minutes, even when the outside temperature is mild. She says a change in routine is often behind these tragedies.

    "Children have stopped going to school, and so there's something new, or someone else is taking them to the daycare," says Larimore. "These things happen across all socioeconomic strata, all types of parents."

    According to the website KidsAndCars.org, nearly 400 children in America have died in hot cars in the last decade, an average of 38 deaths per year.  The summer heat and humidity can also spell trouble for kids who spend time outdoors, as a child's body heats up much faster than an adult's. Dr. Eric Kirkendall says that makes them more susceptible to heat exhaustion, heat cramps and heatstroke.

    "That includes hot, flushed skin typically associated with high fevers, over 104 degrees," Kirkendall explains. "And that's when kids will also start to have altered mental states - they'll start getting really confused and, in some of the worst cases, can have seizures."

    To protect against heat-related illnesses, Kirkendall says parents need to make sure their children stay hydrated and that their exposure to the sun is limited.
 


   (Copyright 2014 by The Associated Press and Prairie News Service.  All Rights Reserved.)

 

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