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TODAY'S THOUGHT

We can always find something to be thankful for, and there may be reasons why we ought to be thankful for even those dispensations which appear dark and frowning.

- Albert Barnes

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 Agriculture News

KHRT AGRICULTURE NEWS - 08/29/17

Time is running out for drought-impacted ranchers in the Northern Plains to apply for a hay lottery...

    BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) - Time is running out for drought-impacted ranchers in the Northern Plains to apply for a hay lottery. The application deadline for ranchers in the Dakotas and Montana is Thursday.
 
     North Dakota's Agriculture Department, North Dakota State University and the Michigan-based nonprofit Ag Community Relief earlier this month announced the program to accept hay donations at a site near the Fargo campus. The hay will be distributed through a lottery drawing early next month. Each state will have a drawing.
 
     Dozens of semitrailer loads of hay have been donated, and more than 1,000 ranchers in the three states have applied.

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     BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) - A South Dakota man has pleaded guilty in a cattle theft case in North Dakota. The North Dakota Stockmen's Association says Jeffrey Fix, of Watertown, South Dakota was accused of failing to pay a Fordville family for three purebred cows and a purebred bull in 2015. He faced a felony theft charge because the value of the animals surpassed $10,000.
 
     Court documents show Fix pleaded guilty in a deal with prosecutors earlier this month and was ordered to pay nearly $30,000 in restitution to Jallo Angus Ranch. If he doesn't make monthly payments, he'll go to prison for three years. Fix also is barred from the livestock industry for five years.

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     BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) - Three North Dakota farmers have partnered with a beekeeper on a pilot project to improve the health of bees and other pollinators. The project, Bee Integrated, is an experiment aiming to better practices of both beekeeping and farming in unison.

    The Bismarck Tribune reports that honey bees contribute their pollinating powers to a third of the country's food supply but pollinator populations are declining. The decline is due to loss of habitat, pests and exposure to chemicals.

    Lamoure farmer Kasey Bitz says he came across the project at a farmer convention and trade show. By signing up for the project he volunteered a portion of his land to be used for planting pollinator mix.

    Bee Integrated project manager Mike Smith says farmers are paid for the use of their land.

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     DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) - Many wheat farmers facing low prices have turned this year to other crops, including chickpeas and lentils, in hopes of turning a profit. This year's wheat crop of 45.7 million acres is the smallest since 1919 and it comes after a 2016 crop that was the least profitable in 30 years. North Dakota, Montana and Nebraska are among the states with significantly fewer wheat acres.

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture says acres planted in chickpeas, also known as garbanzo beans, are up nearly 86 percent from last year. Lentils reached a U.S.-record 1.02 million acres planted this year. Chickpeas are the main ingredient in hummus. Lentils are increasingly used in cereal and pasta as a way to boost protein and fiber.

 

 


   (Copyright 2017 by The Associated Press.  All Rights Reserved.)

 

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