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TODAY'S THOUGHT

We can always find something to be thankful for, and there may be reasons why we ought to be thankful for even those dispensations which appear dark and frowning.

- Albert Barnes

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 Agriculture News

KHRT AGRICULTURE NEWS - 01/12/17

A federal judge is allowing the North Dakota Farmers Union to enter the legal battle over the constitutionality of the state's Depression-era anti-corporate farming law.....

     BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) - A federal judge is allowing the North Dakota Farmers Union to enter the legal battle over the constitutionality of the state's Depression-era anti-corporate farming law. That means Farmers Union will side with the state against North Dakota Farm Bureau, which sued last summer to do away with the law. The two organizations are the state's largest general farm groups.
 
     Farm Bureau contends the law passed by voters in 1932 to protect the state's family farming heritage actually hurts the agriculture industry by limiting farmers' business options.
 
     Farmers Union maintains that family farming is the backbone of North Dakota agriculture.
 
     Judge Daniel Hovland says Farmers Union has a legitimate interest in the case, and should be heard. Hovland also is letting the Dakota Resource Council environmental group help defend the law.

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    FARGO, N.D. - All wheat stored in all positions in North Dakota on December 1, 2016 totaled 264 million bushels, up 3 percent from a year ago, according to the USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service. On-farm stocks of 195 million bushels are up 8 percent from 2015, while off-farm stocks, at 68.5 million bushels, are down 9 percent from last year.

    Durum wheat stored totaled 34.5 million bushels, up 21 percent from a year ago. On-farm stocks of 30.5 million bushels are up 27 percent from 2015, while off-farm stocks, at 3.99 million bushels, are down 10 percent from last year.

    Barley stored in all positions totaled 60.9 million bushels, down 6 percent from 2015. On-farm stocks are 38.0 million bushels, down 16 percent from last year, while off-farm stocks, at 22.9 million bushels, are up 17 percent from last year and a record high.

    Corn stocks totaled 397 million bushels, up 49 percent from a year ago. Of the total, 280 million bushels are stored on farms, up 47 percent from a year ago and a record high, while off-farm stocks, at 117 million bushels, are up 53 percent from last year and a record high.

    Soybean stocks totaled 121 million bushels, up 8 percent from last year. On-farm stocks, at 57.0 million bushels, are down 14 percent from a year ago, while off-farm stocks, at 63.6 million bushels, are up 38 percent from 2015 and a record high.

    Oat stocks totaled 5.41 million bushels, down 12 percent from last year. On-farm stocks, at 4.60 million bushels, are down 16 percent from a year ago, while off-farm stocks, at 808 thousand bushels, are up 21 percent from 2015.

    Hay stocks totaled 4.70 million tons on December 1, down 8 percent from last year.

    Grain storage capacity in North Dakota totaled 1.34 billion bushels, up 31.0 million from December 1, 2015. Total grain storage capacity is comprised of 880 million bushels of on-farm storage, unchanged from last year, and 455 million bushels of off-farm storage, up 31.0 million bushels from 2015.

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     DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) - South Korea is suffering from a shortage of eggs due to bird flu and has finalized agreements to accept imported fresh eggs from United States. South Korea's government says about 26 million chickens have been killed, including one-third of the country's egg-laying hens, since the H5N6 strain of avian influenza first surfaced in November. It's the nation's worst outbreak.
 
     The export is an opportunity for U.S. producers to alleviate a surplus of eggs that developed when they restored egg-laying flocks after the H5N2 strain outbreak in 2015 that killed 49 million turkeys and chickens in 15 states.
 
     While the U.S. remains free of bird flu in commercial poultry production, the disease is a problem in Asia, Europe and elsewhere. Birds have died in Bulgaria, China, Iran, Japan, Nigeria and Taiwan.

 

 


   (Copyright 2016 by The Associated Press.  All Rights Reserved.)

 

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