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TODAY'S THOUGHT

We can always find something to be thankful for, and there may be reasons why we ought to be thankful for even those dispensations which appear dark and frowning.

- Albert Barnes

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 Agriculture News

KHRT AGRICULTURE NEWS - 11/09/17

Agriculture Commissioner Doug Goehring is reminding producers that both personal and commercial transportation expenses are eligible for the Emergency Hay Transportation Assistance Program.....

    BISMARCK, ND (NDDA) - As the deadline to submit eligible expenses for the North Dakota Department of Agriculture's Emergency Hay Transportation Assistance Program nears, Agriculture Commissioner Doug Goehring is reminding producers that both personal and commercial transportation expenses are eligible for the program.

    "There has been some confusion as to whether this program is only for commercial transportation expenses, which is not true," Goehring said. "If you personally hauled more hay than you would in a typical year, those personal transportation expenses are eligible for consideration."

    Goehring said personal transportation expenses are being calculated at $1.40 per loaded mile.

    The program will reimburse eligible producers for a portion of hay transportation expenses incurred between June 1 and Nov. 6, 2017.

    Livestock producers interested in applying should go to NDDA's website at www.nd.gov/ndda to fill out and submit an application or to download a paper version. Applications for the program must be submitted or postmarked by Monday, Nov. 13.

Program eligibility requirements include:

Must have been in a D2, D3 or D4 county.

Must own at least 25 animal unit equivalents of dairy cattle, beef cattle, bison, sheep or goats. A description of animal unit equivalents may be found directly on the application.

Hay must be used for the purposes of the producer's own livestock operation.

In lieu of transporting hay, producers who transported breeding livestock outside of drought counties are also eligible.

Straw used for feed is also eligible.

Transportation costs must have been incurred between June 1 and Nov. 6, 2017.

Must have costs related to personal or commercial transportation outside of an applicant's normal livestock operation.

    Producers must provide verifiable records of livestock inventories and hay transportation expenses. The program will reimburse producers a portion of expenses dependent on the total amount of applications received and approved through the program. Other feeds and supplements are not included. Receipts are not required for personal transportation costs.

    Funding for the program is provided through the Department of Emergency Services. The state emergency commission has approved $1.5 million for the program.

    Questions about filling out the application may be directed to 1-844-642-4752.

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    MINOT, ND (NDSU) - Stockmanship, market trends and drought challenges are among the topics that will be covered during the Dakota Cattle Conference set for Dec. 6-7 at the Holiday Inn in Minot.

    The North Dakota State University Extension Service is bringing together experts from the northern U.S. and Canada to discuss the cattle industry. The conference will follow the Heartland Ag show with a free cattle breeding workshop from 4 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 6, and a dinner and social at 7.

    Bob Weaber, beef genetics specialist from Kansas State University Extension, will conduct the breeding workshop. He will discuss breed objectives, tools for selection, genomics and building a better cow herd.

    Conference activities on Thursday, Dec 7, will start with registration at 9 a.m. The program will run from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

    Session topics and the presenters are:

    * Keynote address, Wintering Cows: Late-season Grazing and Supplementation - Bart Lardner, Western Beef Development Center in Saskatchewan, who has extensive experience and research with forage production, coproduct supplementation, cow nutrition and alternative wintering systems, including swath, bale and residue grazing

    * Beef: Good and Good for You - Eric Berg, professor and associate head of
NDSU's Animal Sciences Department

    * Better Ranching Through Better Stockmanship - Curt Pate, a Montana rancher who has been the driving force for better stockmanship for more than a decade and is a nationally recognized instructor who has conducted demonstrations and clinics on stockmanship and horsemanship throughout North America and Europe

    * Market Trends, Influences and Price Outlook - Jim Robb, senior economist and director of the Livestock Marketing Information Center based in Denver, Colo., who will address what is driving the cattle markets and the forecast for the coming years

    * Ranching in Kazakhstan - Brandon Biwer, agriculture and natural resources agent in NDSU Extension's Divide County office, who will share his experience on a startup ranch

    * Drought Challenges and Management - NDSU Extension beef cattle specialist Carl Dahlen,  alternatives to supplementing low-quality feed and stretching hay; NDSU Extension veterinarian and livestock stewardship specialist Gerald Stokka, understanding nitrate and toxicity risks in drought-stressed feeds; NDSU Extension livestock economist Tim Petry, economic considerations; and NDSU Extension rangeland management specialist Kevin Sedivec, pasture recovery and solar watering options

    The cost of the Thursday program is $40, which includes lunch.

    For more information, contact John Dhuyvetter, NDSU Extension area livestock systems specialist at the North Central Research Extension Center near Minot, at 701-857-7682 or john.dhuyvetterndsu.edu, or Paige Brummund, agriculture and natural resources agent in NDSU Extension's Ward County office, at 701-857-6444 or paige.f.brummundndsu.edu.

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     SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) - The soybean harvest has wrapped up in South Dakota, and the harvest of other late-season crops has advanced.
 
     The federal Agriculture Department says in its weekly crop report that the corn harvest is 61 percent complete, the sunflower harvest 69 percent done and the sorghum harvest 73 percent complete.
 
     The winter wheat crop is 95 percent emerged, with more than half of the crop rated fair to good.
 
     In the ranching community, pasture and range conditions are rated 52 percent poor or very poor. Stock water supplies are 49 percent short or very short.

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     FARGO, N.D. (AP) - Snow in North Dakota over the past week hampered farmers trying to wrap up the late-season harvest.
 
     The federal Agriculture Department says in its weekly crop report that cold weather also put an end to fall field work.
 
     The corn harvest in the state is 59 percent complete, and the sunflower harvest is 72 percent done.
 
     Winter wheat planting is 96 percent done, and 92 percent of the crop has emerged.
 
     In the ranching community, pasture and range conditions are rated 58 percent poor or very poor. Stock water supplies are 55 percent short or very short.

 

 

   (Copyright 2017 by The Associated Press.  All Rights Reserved.)

 

 

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