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TODAY'S THOUGHT

We can always find something to be thankful for, and there may be reasons why we ought to be thankful for even those dispensations which appear dark and frowning.

- Albert Barnes

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 KHRT News Sports and Ag

KHRT ND NEWS - WEDNESDAY - 10/18/17 - NOON EDITION

A California man who authorities say was caught in North Dakota with 183 pounds of marijuana has been sentenced to serve 1 1/2 years in prison....

     BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) - A California man who authorities say was caught in North Dakota with 183 pounds of marijuana has been sentenced to serve 1 1/2 years in prison. Seventy-one-year-old Harold Miller, of Sacramento, California, was arrested August 8th after being pulled over on Interstate 94 near Bismarck. Authorities say he was traveling to Illinois with $700,000 worth of marijuana. The Bismarck Tribune reports that Miller recently pleaded guilty to felony and misdemeanor drug possession charges and was sentenced.
 
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     BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) - Gov. Doug Burgum says state health and law enforcement agencies are being trained to use medication that reverses effects of opioids like heroin and oxycodone. Burgum says a $2 million federal grant will be used for the training.
 
     Burgum last month signed an executive directed cabinet agencies to work with law enforcement and local and tribal governments to make naloxone available to first responders, community leaders and individual opioid users and their family members. Burgum's order says the United States is experiencing an "epidemic" of opioid addiction. He says North Dakota overdose deaths more than tripled between 2013 and 2015.
 
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    BISMARCK, N.D. - Gov. Doug Burgum has appointed former Walsh County prosecutor Barbara Whelan to a judgeship in the Northeast Judicial District, effective October 23rd. Whelan will be chambered in Grafton. She replaces Judge M. Richard Geiger, who retired October 1st after 23 years as a Northeast Judicial District judge and seven years as a county judge before that.
 
    Whelan has extensive experience in civil and criminal courtrooms, including as a prosecutor and defense attorney. She served as Walsh County state's attorney from 2006 until Oct. 15 of this year and as Pembina County state's attorney from 1999 to 2005. She worked in private practice from 1990 to 1998, including four years as a partner in the Tisdale & Whelan firm in Grafton.

    Whelan, who grew up in Turtle Lake, Carrington and Harvey, received her law degree in 1990 from the University of Baltimore (Md.) School of Law and a bachelor's degree in hospital administration in 1986 from Concordia College in Moorhead, Minn.

    In addition to her work as an attorney, Whelan has served on the boards of North Dakota Teen Challenge, a faith-based treatment center for individuals addicted to alcohol and/or drugs; IPAT, a nonprofit entity providing assistive technology services to disabled and elderly people to allow them to remain in their homes; and Tri-County Crisis Intervention, a domestic violence agency and shelter.

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     GLADSTONE, N.D. (AP) - A hay bale fire on a semitrailer shut down a portion of Interstate 94 in southwestern North Dakota for about four hours. The Highway Patrol says the bales on the semi started on fire Tuesday 3 miles east of Gladstone. The driver was able to disconnect his cab from the trailers and wasn't hurt. The westbound lanes of the interstate were closed at the Taylor exit, and traffic was rerouted until the fire was out and the scene cleared.
 
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     MEDORA, N.D. (AP) - A national park in North Dakota is reducing the size of its bison herd this week in a move that will benefit several Native American tribes. The Bismarck Tribune reports that a majority of the animals from Theodore Roosevelt National Park will help supplement tribal herds through the InterTribal Buffalo Council. The council represents about 60 tribes across 19 states.
 
     Wildlife biologist Blake McCann says the reduction roundup is to prevent the bison herds from getting too large to ensure there's enough available forage for the grazing animals. He says the park aims to keep its herd at about 300 to 500 animals at the South Unit and less than 300 at the North Unit. South Dakota and North Dakota are among the states that will receive the animals.
 

 


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