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 Agriculture News

KHRT AGRICULTURE NEWS - 06/23/14

    FARGO, ND - Moisture and temperatures varied across the state last week, according to the USDA Weekly Crop and Weather Report. The largest rainfall amounts of 1-3 inches were reported in the eastern and southern parts of the state. Average temperatures ranged from 0 to 3 degrees above normal over much of the east while the west experienced temperatures that were 0 to 4 degrees below normal.

    Producers were busy spraying their crops last week but had difficulty completing this work as rain and windy conditions hampered progress.
Statewide, there were 4.5 days considered suitable for fieldwork.

    Topsoil moisture supplies rated 0 percent very short, 3 short, 68 adequate, and 29 surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 0 percent very short, 1 short, 74 adequate, and 25 surplus.

    Winter wheat jointed advanced to 91 percent. Headed was 44 percent. Winter wheat condition rated 4 percent very poor, 11 poor, 40 fair, 41 good, and 4 excellent.

    Durum wheat planted rated 97 percent, ahead of last year at 92 and the five-year average of 89. Emerged was 87 percent, ahead of 80 last year and 83 average. Jointing rated 19 percent, ahead of 14 last year, but well behind 35 average. Condition rated 0 percent very poor, 1 poor, 10 fair, 83 good, and 6 excellent.

    Spring wheat emerged was 97 percent, well ahead of last year at 78 and 92 average. Jointed was 45 percent, well ahead of last year at 20, but near 48 average. Headed rated 5 percent, ahead of last year at 0 percent, but behind 12 average. Spring wheat condition rated 1 percent very poor, 2 poor, 14 fair, 68 good, and 15 excellent.

    Barley emerged was 97 percent, well ahead of 75 last year and 89 average. Jointing advanced to 50 percent, well ahead of 17 last year, but near 47 average. Headed rated 3 percent, ahead of 0 last year, but behind 11 average. Barley condition rated 0 percent very poor, 1 poor, 18 fair, 68 good, and 13 excellent.

    Oats emerged was at 95 percent, ahead of 87 last year and 92 average. Jointing rated 49 percent, ahead of 40 last year, but behind 57 average. Headed was at 4 percent, near 2 last year, but behind 10 average. Oats condition rated 1 percent very poor, 1 poor, 11 fair, 80 good, and 7 excellent.

    Canola emerged was 95 percent, well ahead of 63 last year and 85 average. Blooming was 11 percent, ahead of 0 last year, but near 12 average. Condition rated 0 percent very poor, 1 poor, 19 fair, 62 good, and 18 excellent.

    Flaxseed planted was 99 percent, ahead of last year at 81 and 90 average. Emerged was 87 percent, well ahead of 56 last year and 79 average. Blooming was 5 percent, ahead of 0 last year, but near 4 average. Condition rated 0 percent very poor, 1 poor, 18 fair, 71 good, and 10 excellent.

    Dry edible peas emerged was 99 percent, ahead of 90 last year and 89 average. Blooming was 25 percent, ahead of 0 last year and 20 average. Dry peas condition rated 0 percent very poor, 2 poor, 23 fair, 66 good, and 9 excellent.

    Dry beans were 96 percent planted, well ahead of 85 last year, but near 96 average. Emerged was 87 percent, well ahead of 46 last year and 78 average. Condition rated 1 percent very poor, 4 poor, 19 fair, 61 good, and 15 excellent.

    Potatoes planted was 93 percent, ahead of 82 last year, but near 95 average. Emerged was 60 percent, well ahead of last year at 36, but behind 72 average. Condition rated 10 percent very poor, 4 poor, 21 fair, 60 good, and 5 excellent.

    Corn emerged was 95 percent, ahead of 86 last year, but near 96 average. Corn condition rated 0 percent very poor, 1 poor, 14 fair, 70 good, and 15 excellent.

    Soybeans emerged were 100 percent, ahead of 91 last year and 97 average. Condition rated 0 percent very poor, 1 poor, 14 fair, 69 good, and 16 excellent.

    Sunflower planting was 93 percent complete, ahead of 76 last year and 89 average.

    Pasture and range conditions rated 1 percent very poor, 2 poor, 12 fair, 63 good, and 22 excellent.

    Stock water supplies rated 0 percent very short, 1 short, 78 adequate, and 21 surplus.

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     OMAHA, Neb. (AP) - The backlog of grain shipments across the Plains has been reduced this spring, but U.S. regulators are requiring BNSF and Canadian Pacific railroads to provide weekly updates on their efforts to catch up before harvest.
 
     The U.S. Surface Transportation Board has told BNSF and Canadian Pacific to submit plans to address the backlog and begin filing weekly updates. The order is similar to the updates regulators required on fertilizer shipments this spring after farm groups complained.
 
     The delays in grain shipments have been especially pronounced in northern Plains states, such as North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana and Minnesota.
 
     Mark Watne, president of the North Dakota Farmers Union, said Monday that he remains concerned about the railroads' ability to move enough grain to clear storage space for the harvest.

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     MANDAN, N.D. (AP) - The National Sunflower Association is holding its annual summer seminar in South Dakota.  The Mandan-based group says the three-day meeting begins Tuesday at The Lodge in Deadwood, South Dakota.  The group says the annual meeting gives industry leaders and producers a chance to network and learn about what's happening in the sunflower industry.
 
     The Dakotas typically produce the bulk of the nation's crop. The two states last year accounted for more than three-fourths of the country's crop.
 
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     BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) - Agriculture leaders in North Dakota say revised rules that will expand exports of U.S. beef to Hong Kong could benefit ranchers in the state.  The Bismarck Tribune reports that new exporting terms were announced this week with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Hong Kong will now permit imports of all U.S. beef and beef products.
 
     Agriculture Commissioner Doug Goehring says the relaxed importing rules will allow North Dakota to get a bigger share of the Hong Kong market. He says it will also create more economic opportunities.
 
     Julie Schaff Ellingson, the executive vice president of the North Dakota Stockmen's Association, says it's hard to tell how much more U.S. beef will be imported into Hong Kong. But she says it's "huge step" in the right direction.

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     BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) - The United States Department of Agriculture says North Dakota and South Dakota are two of five states eligible to receive a combined $8 million to help protect declining honey bee populations.
 
     The Conservation Reserve Program incentives will also be offered to farmers and ranchers in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan who establish new habitats for honey bees. The USDA announced the funding Friday.
 
     The program allows for managing or replacing existing vegetation, known as "covers", with lower cost, high nutrition seed mixes that can support plants that benefit pollinators like the honey bee.
 
     The honey bee population in the country has been declining for decades. The USDA says there were 6 million honey bee colonies in 1947. There are an estimated 2.5 million today.

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     FARGO, N.D. (AP) - North Dakota officials are cracking down on people who are riding ATVs and dirt bikes on sandbars and beaches, including landowners along the waterways who previously had access to state-owned land.
 
     A rule change that goes into effect July 1st will prohibit motorized vehicles along the beds and banks of larger rivers, except mainly for farmers and ranchers who need to fix a fence or round up cattle.
 
     Authorities are mostly targeting the Missouri River, which is a recreational hotspot for boaters, jet skiers and sunbathers. State Water Commission officials say the area is taking a beating from the vehicles, litter and noise.
 
     State sovereign lands manager Jerry Heiser says reaction to the rule change has been mixed. Some say it's needed and others view it as government intrusion.

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     FARGO, N.D. (AP) - An appeals court says a judge made a mistake by not appointing counsel for a Blanchard horse farmer who repeatedly demanded and rejected lawyers in a case that centered on North Dakota's fence law.
 
     La Verne Koenig was convicted in 2009 for failing to maintain a legal fence and allowing his horses to run at large. He was ordered to pay $5,400 in restitution.
 
     Koenig appealed and asked for a new lawyer. A judge determined that Koenig waived his right to a court-appointed attorney for the appeal because he refused to cooperate with his lawyers during the trial.
 
     A three-judge panel of the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in a 2-1 vote that Koenig should have been provided representation. The case has been sent back to federal court.

 

   (Copyright 2014 by The Associated Press.  All Rights Reserved.)

 

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